Other

Emoticons and symbols aren’t ruining language – they’re revolutionizing it

txt msgs r running language

*ruining

lol, jk!! :)

In many casual discussions of language and the internet, it’s not uncommon to hear about how such “textspeak ruins language” – how technology has made everybody lazy with their speech and writing. Major media outlets such as the LA Times, the BBC and The Daily Mail have all bemoaned the ways in which people communicate through technology.

Reduce children's test anxiety with these tips—and a re-think of what testing means

The term "test anxiety" typically conjures up images of a high school or university student obsessing over an upcoming exam.

 

Certainly, older students have been the focus of more than a half a century of research examining test and assessment anxiety and its impact on grades. Researchers know that such test anxiety generally has a negative impact on academic achievement.

How people talk now holds clues about human migration centuries ago

Often, you can tell where someone grew up by the way they speak.

For example, if someone in the United States doesn’t pronounce the final “r” at the end of “car,” you might think they are from the Boston area, based on sometimes exaggerated stereotypes about American accents and dialects, such as “Pahk the cahr in Hahvahd Yahd.”

Language: why we like some words more than others

When we listen to a foreign language, we may hear sounds which do not exist in our mother tongue, and may sound different from anything we have ever heard before. The first time we hear something new, a foreign sound or word – even an unknown word in our own languages – something in it may provoke delight or revulsion.

Often with familiar words, it’s almost impossible to simply look at one and separate it from its meaning. Words like “putrid” or “disgusting” have nasty connotations already built in to our subconscious and therefore meaning will play a key role.

Two in five people think they would be a good teacher but low pay and workload deters them, unions say

Nearly half of us believe we would make a good teacher, a survey has found – but many of those interested in taking up the profession are just not entering classrooms.

A “crushing” workload, low pay and “attacks on professionalism” are behind the low uptake, unions have said.

Brexit could create a new ‘language’ – Euro-English

Brexit could lead to the development of a new form of the English language, according to a new academic paper.

Dr Marko Modiano, of Gavle University in Sweden, said there were already signs that “Euro-English” was developing its own distinct way of speaking.

And this could eventually be codified in a dictionary and taught in schools in much the same way that American or Australian English is today if English is retained as the lingua franca of the European Union after the UK leaves.